amazon button

16 posts / 0 new
Last post
Bluedog's picture
Bluedog
Offline
Joined: 16-12-10
Aug 20 2011 11:49
amazon button

I know libcom has a link that you can use to buy stuff from amazon so that libcom gets some money, but i thought it would be a good idea if you created (or are there ones already provided?) a button to go under your facebook one that people could just click on and go straight through to amazon. Would stop us always asking for the link because we cant find it.

On that note...could someone provide me with the link please smile

Steven.'s picture
Steven.
Offline
Joined: 27-06-06
Aug 20 2011 12:04

Hi, sorry but we don't want a visible link/ad for Amazon on every page!

The link should be easy to find as it is right on our donate page, which is linked to on every page of libcom down at the bottom:
http://libcom.org/notes/donate

Bluedog's picture
Bluedog
Offline
Joined: 16-12-10
Aug 20 2011 12:27

ok cool.

Thanks, i always forget to look at the bottom of the website. Maybe the donate link should be in a more prominent place.

Armchair Anarchist's picture
Armchair Anarchist
Offline
Joined: 16-12-07
Aug 31 2011 11:17
Bluedog wrote:
ok cool.

Thanks, i always forget to look at the bottom of the website. Maybe the donate link should be in a more prominent place.

Agree with this - a lot of people won't look 'below the fold'. I've just bought something via the libcom Amazon link and tbh it was a struggle to find it - also the text/background contrast in the footer is very low which doesn't help.

Jacques Roux's picture
Jacques Roux
Offline
Joined: 17-07-06
Aug 21 2015 09:05
Can someone confirm that the Amazon link is still valid? http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/redirect.html?link_code=ur2&tag=libcom-21&camp=1634&creative=6738 EDIT: Confirmed it does still work.
Fnordie's picture
Fnordie
Offline
Joined: 6-02-07
Aug 21 2015 11:07
Seriously, don't buy stuff from Amazon. There's been a boycott called.
ocelot's picture
ocelot
Offline
Joined: 15-11-09
Aug 21 2015 11:25
Sorry, but the idea of boycotting capitalist companies in order to try and get them to be less profit-oriented sounds even more pointless than electing Jeremy Corbyn as leader of the Labour Party. Are our horizons really so low?
Noah Fence's picture
Noah Fence
Offline
Joined: 18-12-12
Aug 21 2015 12:29
ocelot wrote:
Sorry, but the idea of boycotting capitalist companies in order to try and get them to be less profit-oriented sounds even more pointless than electing Jeremy Corbyn as leader of the Labour Party. Are our horizons really so low?
This. Shopping ethically, or rather trying to shop less unethically is such a liberal dead end. The principle and the faulty but massively popular idea of it as the best means of exercising some sort of control over capital , I believe, is one of the biggest stumbling blocks to creating understanding in the general population of the true nature of capitalism. Anyhow, the fact is that 'ethics' are yet another part of many companies marketing strategy and are used to justify inflated prices which many people willing pay to feed their conscience or to enjoy s smug superiority over us selfish bargain hunters.
Chilli Sauce's picture
Chilli Sauce
Offline
Joined: 5-10-07
Aug 21 2015 13:07
Just to echo the others, I think there's very little viability in boycotts - and especially in this one which is never really going to spread out beyond a select group of lefties anyway. That said, there is worker organizing going on at Amazon warehouses around the world that we can and should be supporting. And which is going to be far more effective than a boycott. That said, I also have a questions, does libcom still collect the proceeds through the American amazon.com? I always get bounced around when I try to do buy anything stateside using the link Steven posted above.
radicalgraffiti
Offline
Joined: 4-11-07
Aug 21 2015 13:13
theres been a boycott against nestle for almost 40 years and its achieved nothing, consumer boycotts by them selves are useless. Coordinated with other action they can help, so if the workers at amazon do something and ask for a boycott to back it up they i will take part.
Fnordie's picture
Fnordie
Offline
Joined: 6-02-07
Aug 21 2015 16:07
It's not about ethical consumption. Boycotts are a legitimate tactic. I worked on the boycott of a Sheraton hotel for several years that the workers had voted for during a labor dispute. Eventually they won, after costing their employer more than a million dollars in lost business. edit - my mistake, I was under the impression the boycott had been called by the union GMB; actually it was called by a small group of former Amazon workers called Amazon Anonymous. No, I don't exactly rate their chances...but it's not as if we never take on crazy ambitious Sisyphean fights, right?
Joseph Kay's picture
Joseph Kay
Offline
Joined: 14-03-06
Aug 21 2015 16:03
Aside from whether general open ended boycotts (as opposed to targeted ones supplementing a struggle) are a good idea, I'm not even sure how possible it is to boycott Amazon: https://libcom.org/library/boycotting-amazon-boycotting-ukuncut-or-why-thin-understanding-post-fordist-capitalism-f
Chilli Sauce's picture
Chilli Sauce
Offline
Joined: 5-10-07
Aug 21 2015 16:23
Fnordie wrote:
It's not about ethical consumption. Boycotts are a legitimate tactic. I worked on the boycott of a Sheraton hotel for several years that the workers had voted for during a labor dispute. Eventually they won, after costing their employer more than a million dollars in lost business. edit - my mistake, I was under the impression the boycott had been called by the union GMB; actually it was called by a small group of former Amazon workers called Amazon Anonymous. No, I don't exactly rate their chances...but it's not as if we never take on crazy ambitious Sisyphean fights, right?
That's fair enough, F, but as JK has already pointed out, a boycott as a targetted tactic by workers in a dispute who can help enforce the boycott (with pickets, presumably?) is a very different thing than an open-ended 'boycott bad things' type of boycott, which seems to be the case with Amazon. I'll be honest, I think in general boycotts are a sign of weakness and reflect a weakness in both organisational capacity and confidence and, unfortunately, buy into the idea that our power is as consumers and not workers.
Fnordie's picture
Fnordie
Offline
Joined: 6-02-07
Aug 21 2015 16:43
I agree with that. I feel a little silly for assuming this was associated with the warehouse organizing in Poland and the UK...just because those campaigns are in progress, and the boycott demands include "living wages," etc. In general I'm a big proponent of worker-led boycotts as a tactic. In high-turnover service sector jobs, they can be more effective than strikes.
Chilli Sauce's picture
Chilli Sauce
Offline
Joined: 5-10-07
Aug 21 2015 16:52
Quote:
In general I'm a big proponent of worker-led boycotts as a tactic. In high-turnover service sector jobs, they can be more effective than strikes.
I don't know if I agree with that, but given that you have experience with that sort of thing, I am interested to hear more. Should we split this discussion - start a boycotts as tactics thread?
Fnordie's picture
Fnordie
Offline
Joined: 6-02-07
Aug 21 2015 17:05
Yeah, why not. If you can pry Flint away from the Kurdish threads I'm sure he'd have a lot to add too. We both worked on the same hotel boycott, but he's still involved with that union (I'm not).