What are the roots of anarchist-communism in the US?

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Craftwork's picture
Craftwork
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Jun 15 2017 15:20
What are the roots of anarchist-communism in the US?
From where/when does anarchist-communism in the US actually originate? I can't find much literature dealing with this question.
adri
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Jun 15 2017 17:14
Craftwork wrote:
From where/when does anarchist-communism in the US actually originate?

I can't find much literature dealing with this question.

Berkman and Goldman? At least I think they were among the ones who popularized anarcho-communism in the US.

petey
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Jun 15 2017 17:38

good topic. if i weren't on phone I'd scrounge up a few links, but there is material on this site iirc.

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Craftwork
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Jun 15 2017 21:05

I think it's earliest phase was with Joseph Déjacque's Le Libertaire, which was published from 1858 to 1861, although it seems unlikely that his influence was more than marginal.

Probably some time after 1881, when the Social Revolutionists split from the SLP and affiliated with the IWPA (which was founded in the same year).

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spacious
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Jun 15 2017 21:47

In a broader sense (perhaps broader than what you mean here), Loren Goldner has argued that the indigenous U.S. radical tradition stems from "the fusion of anabaptist, Indian and African":

https://libcom.org/library/fusion-anabaptist-indian-african-american-radical-tradition-loren-goldner

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klas batalo
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Jun 16 2017 03:26

probably the russians and the italians to be quite honest... both had fairly large immigrant concentrations... the IWPA was definitely one the first manifestations, but the AS and AC russians in exile after 1905 (see the Union of Russian Toilers/Workers) and malatesta and others in the italian immigrant anarchist groups also probably contributed...

other than that maybe read Unruly Equality and Left of the Left, to find clues...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anarchism_in_the_United_States#Early_American_anarcho-communism

syndicalist
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Jun 16 2017 04:45

An interesting article relative to this discussion:

Fall 2004
The Firebrand and the Forging of a New Anarchism:
Anarchist Communism and Free Love

https://web.archive.org/web/20110606151412/http://userwww.sfsu.edu/~jmmoran/firebrand_freelove.htm

I believe theres something in A Short History of Anarchism by Max Nettlau (Freedom Press).

Need to check The International Anarchist Congress, Amsterdam 1907 by Maurizio Antonioli (Black Cat Press, Edmonton). I provided a report by Emma Goldman to that conference and I think she made some reference to some of the US origins.

Might be some generalized info in "Beer and revolution: The German anarchist movement in New York City, 1880-1914" by Tom Doyens:
https://libcom.org/library/beer-revolution-german-anarchist-movement-new-york-city-1880-1914-tom-goyens

From my read of the comments above, most folks are hitting on the right bases.

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Jun 16 2017 06:00

I'd say Italians and Jews too. Check out Immigrants Against the State: Yiddish and Italian Anarchism in America by Kenyon Zimmer.

Here's from the book's blurb:

Quote:
From the 1880s through the 1940s, tens of thousands of first- and second-generation immigrants embraced the anarchist cause after arriving on American shores. Kenyon Zimmer explores why these migrants turned to anarchism and how their adoption of its ideology shaped their identities, experiences, and actions.

Zimmer focuses on Italians and Eastern European Jews in San Francisco, New York City, and Paterson, New Jersey. Tracing the movement's changing fortunes from the pre–World War I era through the Spanish Civil War, Zimmer argues that anarchists, opposed to both American and Old World nationalism, severed all attachments to their nations of origin but also resisted assimilation into their host society. Their radical cosmopolitan outlook and identity instead embraced diversity and extended solidarity across national, ethnic, and racial divides. Though in the end unable to withstand the onslaught of Americanism and other nationalisms, the movement nonetheless provided an important example of a transnational collective identity delinked from the nation-state and racial hierarchies.